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May 13, 2014

A Green’s perspective on Arlington’s affordable housing progam–complete failure

Affordable Housing — @ 10:26 am

house_sketchPublic testimony from Arlington Green member and former AGP chairman Steve Davis before the Arlington County Board on May 10, 2014

Good morning members of the County Board.

Today I am here to speak about our affordable housing program In 2013, the county added only 55 new committed affordable housing apartments (CAFs). The county board years ago set a target of adding 400 new CAF units annually. So last year the county government met only 14% of your target.

Last year in Arlington, the number of private affordable market rate apartments fell by 1,613—so the county housing program added 55 units, and then market forces took away 1,613. Only 3,437 affordable private rental apartments exist today (down from 20,000 in the Year 2000). The Va. Tech Center for Housing Research says Arlington needs 14,000 more affordable rental apartments for people making less than 60-percent of area median income.

$250,000– is the unit cost in AHIF (Arlington Housing Investment Fund) funds for each of the 66 affordable apartments CAFs at the Serrano Apartments on Columbia Pike for renters earning 60-percent or less AMI; the actual total cost of each these apartments was $250,000 as well. The total AHIF loan you approved last month was $16.5 million for the Serrano.

In January, you approved a separate $7.8 million loan for APAH for 71 new CAFs ($110,000 per unit in AHIF funds) at the Carlin Springs Apartments. These new units actually cost $538,000 each ($38.2 million total cost) even though APAH already owned the land. Free land does not mean low cost apartments.

$100 million—is what it would cost annually in AHIF funds to add 400 CAFs annually at the average cost of $250,000 each.

Given the need for 14,000 more apartments, and the exorbitant cost of new CAFs, our program will never succeed.

I suggest once again you look to the model of the Fairfax County Housing Authority that today adds CAFs for $100,000 per unit, and mainly houses people in Fairfax who make under $40,000 a year.

house_sketchSteve Davis

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